EMERGENCY MEASURES: Behind and beyond the tide of misery flooding our emergency departments

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EMERGENCY MEASURES: Behind and beyond the tide of misery flooding our emergency departments

Liane
Topham-Kindley
Boy in hospital
The Ministry of Health regularly reviews emergency department admissions. From the data collected it appears most people who got to ED need to be there

Liane Topham-Kindley investigates the rising tide of attendance in our hospitals’ emergency departments and asks how it can be pushed back

Waikato Hospital’s emergency department was overwhelmed this winter as patients waited in corridors, hundreds were directed to primar, Long waits for a hospital bed are approaching the serious levels seen in Australia, emergency physician John Bonning says, John Bonning

Comments

So one of the drivers for high use of EDs is the persisting mantra of DHBs and Governments of either political shade to push for large GP clinics, call them something flash like an IFHC and think episodic care is true General Practice.  Our DHB openly denigrates the traditional self-employed GP role where people actually have a relationship with a specific GP even though this has been shown to reduce ED attendance, provide better on-going health maintenance and most importantly be the number one predictor of retention in rural areas.