Convincing patients to use smarter, greener inhalers for asthma management

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PHARMACOTHERAPY

Convincing patients to use smarter, greener inhalers for asthma management

By Linda Bryant
 John says he needs his blue inhaler to help him breathe better when playing rugby
John says he needs his blue inhaler to help him breathe better when playing rugby

With the cold blast of winter, there is the usual rush of people with asthma wanting their inhalers. It is also a good time to review asthma control and discuss the suitability of the relatively new approach to managing mild asthma

Linda Bryant

This article has been endorsed by the RNZCGP and has been approved for up to 0.25 CME credits for the General Practice Educational Programme and conti
References
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  1. Reddel HK, FitzGerald JM, Bateman ED, et al. GINA 2019: a fundamental change in asthma management: Treatment of asthma with short-acting bronchodilators alone is no longer recommended for adults and adolescents. Eur Respir J 2019;53(6):1901046.
  1. Bryant L, Bang C, Chew C, et al. Adequacy of inhaler technique used by people with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. J Prim Health Care 2013;5(3):191–98.
  1. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Patient decision aid: Inhalers for asthma. May 2019. https://bit.ly/2Ek0CPo