A dog’s life: How animal therapy is catching on

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A dog’s life: How animal therapy is catching on

Keira
Stephenson
Dave Gould and Emmett
David Gould had owned his retail pharmacy in Parnell for 30 years when one day he got a pneumococcal septicaemic infection that led to amputation of both of his arms and legs. His dog Emmett has been with him for 9 years

Cuddly, lovable, non-judgemental and, mostly, unflappable. That’s what assistance dogs have to offer but first, Keira Stephenson finds, you have to get officialdom on board

Although most people acquire the dogs for their skills, it is the psychosocial benefits and companionship they end up appreciating most THE IDEA , Gail Harbott with her dog Coda who is a graduate of the Puppies in Prison programme, Gail Harbott with her dog Coda who is a graduate of the Puppies in Prison programme

Comments

"Animals are the bridge between us and the beauty of all that is natural. They show us what's missing in our lives, and how to love ourselves more completely and unconditionally. They connect us back to who we are, and to the purpose of why we're here." ― Trisha McCagh

How can that not be good for the soul?

I was inspired to do rural medicine when doing a final year student placement on the Isle of Bute. My tutor had a black Lab in his consults which was amazing.  Wish I could bring my dogs to work here..